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The year 1919: A point in time, European countries, a young woman, a young man and an elderly gentleman. This is the musical triptych that Marion Leleu and pianist Bertrand Giraud, who plays the wonderful grand piano Opus 102 by Stephen Paulello, have chosen for our album. These three composers could scarcely be more different, whether in their social situation, their geographical background, or their psychological make-up. Nevertheless the three are linked by their inspiration and their powers of musical invention, which is what has fascinated Marion Leleu from the start of this project. Like the waves of the sea in her homeland of Brittany, their melodic phrases come and go, they grow, develop amazing power, finally burst apart or die away gently. Joseph Ryelandt's Sonata op. 73 enthralled her at once and she is very happy to be the first to record this work and bring out the score in a new edition together with Bertrand Giraud. This music deserves to be better known, and she hope it will soon be part of the Romantic repertoire for the viola. The Sonata op.11/4 by Paul Hindemith is like a river or a journey, and although the playing time is not very long, you can feel like a marathon and remains a continuing challenge for the artists. The last work, the Sonata by Rebecca Clarke, is a necessary and moving call to offer her female successors greater visibility and freedom in the world of music. Marion Leleu: "Playing this work is like a return to the source of your feelings as a musician."
The year 1919: A point in time, European countries, a young woman, a young man and an elderly gentleman. This is the musical triptych that Marion Leleu and pianist Bertrand Giraud, who plays the wonderful grand piano Opus 102 by Stephen Paulello, have chosen for our album. These three composers could scarcely be more different, whether in their social situation, their geographical background, or their psychological make-up. Nevertheless the three are linked by their inspiration and their powers of musical invention, which is what has fascinated Marion Leleu from the start of this project. Like the waves of the sea in her homeland of Brittany, their melodic phrases come and go, they grow, develop amazing power, finally burst apart or die away gently. Joseph Ryelandt's Sonata op. 73 enthralled her at once and she is very happy to be the first to record this work and bring out the score in a new edition together with Bertrand Giraud. This music deserves to be better known, and she hope it will soon be part of the Romantic repertoire for the viola. The Sonata op.11/4 by Paul Hindemith is like a river or a journey, and although the playing time is not very long, you can feel like a marathon and remains a continuing challenge for the artists. The last work, the Sonata by Rebecca Clarke, is a necessary and moving call to offer her female successors greater visibility and freedom in the world of music. Marion Leleu: "Playing this work is like a return to the source of your feelings as a musician."
4260123644109

Details

Format: CD
Label: Solo Musica
Rel. Date: 10/07/2022
UPC: 4260123644109

More Info:

The year 1919: A point in time, European countries, a young woman, a young man and an elderly gentleman. This is the musical triptych that Marion Leleu and pianist Bertrand Giraud, who plays the wonderful grand piano Opus 102 by Stephen Paulello, have chosen for our album. These three composers could scarcely be more different, whether in their social situation, their geographical background, or their psychological make-up. Nevertheless the three are linked by their inspiration and their powers of musical invention, which is what has fascinated Marion Leleu from the start of this project. Like the waves of the sea in her homeland of Brittany, their melodic phrases come and go, they grow, develop amazing power, finally burst apart or die away gently. Joseph Ryelandt's Sonata op. 73 enthralled her at once and she is very happy to be the first to record this work and bring out the score in a new edition together with Bertrand Giraud. This music deserves to be better known, and she hope it will soon be part of the Romantic repertoire for the viola. The Sonata op.11/4 by Paul Hindemith is like a river or a journey, and although the playing time is not very long, you can feel like a marathon and remains a continuing challenge for the artists. The last work, the Sonata by Rebecca Clarke, is a necessary and moving call to offer her female successors greater visibility and freedom in the world of music. Marion Leleu: "Playing this work is like a return to the source of your feelings as a musician."
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